Hometown History Tours announces two Monroe, MI walking tours

Battle of the River Raisin (War of  1812)

Saturday:  Sept 26

River Raisin Battlefield Visitors center soon to become a National Park
River Raisin Battlefield Visitors center soon to become a National Park

The War of 1812 usually doesn’t rank much interest when it comes to United States history, yet it’s considered by many as America’s second war for independence.

The War of 1812 is filled with intrigue, drama and debate. Imagine the nation’s capital city  set afire and the White House looted. As everyone flees, the First Lady remains behind, attempting to save national treasures.

What prompted this war between a young nation and its former protectorate? Years of unresolved disputes? Trade issues or a land-grabbing mentality? Did Britain feel threatened by American maritime supremacy? Did a pompous attitude falsely lead Americans to believe we could easily seize and claim Canada?

Woodland Cemetery monument dedicated to locals who fought in the Battle of the River Raisin
Woodland Cemetery monument dedicated to locals who fought in the Battle of the River Raisin

One of the bloodiest battles of the War of 1812 took place along the banks of  Monroe, Michigan’s  Raisin River. Join Monroe County Historical Museum Assistant Director Dave Ingall as he recounts the history behind the War of 1812 and our region’s major role in America’s second fight for independence.

$12 (Includes any admission fees)

Meet 9:45 AM at  River Raisin Battlefield Visitor’s Center, 1403 East Elm Street, Monroe.

Lot’s of walking! Wear comfortable shoes and clothing. Tour held rain or shine.

Click here to register online via PayPal for Saturday, September 26 tour

Click here to pay by check or money order

General Custer’s Monroe

Saturday: Oct 17

Acclaimed living historian Steve Alexander leads Custer's Monroe walking tour
Acclaimed Custer living historian Steve Alexander poses before the restored Bacon-Custer home featured on the walking tour

Step back in time and walk where the General once walked. General Custer’s Monroe takes you back in time to the Monroe of this famous General’s era.

A few stops on this tour include: the First Presbyterian Church where Custer wed Elizabeth “Libbie” Bacon in what was dubbed “the wedding of the century,” Martin’s Shoe Store (still in business) where Custer purchased his boots, the restored Bacon/Custer home where Libbie resided when she met and married the dashing General and the home they once shared, the First Methodist Episcopal Church where the Custer family attended services and the final memorial service was held to honor the Monroe men killed at the Battle of Little Big Horn, and historic Woodland Cemetery, site of the Custer and Bacon family plots. Welcome to the General’s hometown of Monroe, Michigan.

This walking tour is led by none other than renowned Custer living historian Steve Alexander. Proclaimed by United States Congress as the “foremost Custer living historian,” Alexander has appeared as the General in over 20 television docudramas featured on the Arts & Entertainment, Discovery and History channels. Both the Michigan and Ohio Senates have acknowledged him for his lifetime work and portrayal of America’s most controversial military leader.

$12 (includes admission to Monroe County Historical Museum and narrated tour of Custer Exhibit)

Meet 9:45 AM at Custer  Statue (Elm and Monroe Streets)

Lot’s of walking! Wear comfortable shoes and clothing. Tour held rain or shine.

Click here to register online via PayPal for Saturday, October 17 tour

Click here to pay by check or money order

Advance Registration Required!

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